WORLD OF GOO’S KYLE GABLER GIVES TOP 7 GLOBAL GAME JAM TIPS


1.29.2009

Brandon Boyer

5 Replies

In the Global Game Jam‘s first ever (and ridiculously awesome) keynote, 2D Boy co-founder and World of Goo creator Kyle Gabler — an expert on rapid dev, having helped found Carnegie Mellon’s Experimental Gameplay project — gives his top tips for fresh-faced indie devs, covering the importance of audio, originality, and (channeling… Tyra Banks) looking your best for the media.

You also get bonus cameos by IGDA’s Jason Della Rocca and Susan Gold, as well as Crayon Physics creator Petri Purho and Audiosurf‘s Dylan Fitterer! It’s a must-watch.

As we noted yesterday, 5pm on Friday marks the beginning of the inaugural jam (supported by IGDA, cross platform engine Unity, and Mekensleep, creators of DS Offworld-favorite Soul Bubbles), and will see 2,000 participants at 53 locations in 23 countries taking 48 hours to create a game.

We here will be making the rounds covering our respective local jams: I’ll be doing my damndest to make it to Austin Community College over the weekend to see how things progress, Gadgets’ Rob Beschizza will be at Carnegie Mellon (where the 2D Boys are said to be dropping by), and the Mother Boing crew will be on West Coast duty. Looking forward to seeing what everyone comes up with!

Global Game Jam

Previously:
Global Game Jam (48 hour videogame dev marathon) this weekend …

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COMMENTS

  1. [Can’t login on Offworld, because my feedreader uses the IE renderer, even though I can log in, comment, etc. properly on the main boing boing pages…]

    Pretty neat stuff.. too bad there’s no info on how one can actually learn to code games independantly. Because that would be cool.


  2. Do you know if they’ll be announcing the themes for the various locations soon after they start – for those of us unable to attend, but who fancy ‘playing along at home’?


  3. I make music for games, does anyone need any? how do I get my stuff out there, withuot even charging for it?

    I just want my music to be in a game and I specialize in 16-bit sounding music



  4. Pingback: Ask yourself, how did we get here: how ‘indie’ has evolved | VENUS PATROL